©
exercicedestyle:

Gaultier.

exercicedestyle:

Gaultier.

dekonstruktivisme:

Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1998.
“During the second phase of the fashion process, when the identified sources are presented for the first time to a public, there is a need for some distance: the forms have not yet been tempered, the public’s resistance has not been tested. A meticulously staged ritual, bordering on the theatrical, is required. For clothing, the fashion show provides this milieu,…” Val K. Warke, “Architecture. Observing the mechanisms of fashion”, in Architecture: In Fashion, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, 1994, p. 135.
Maison Martin Margiela. Collection Spring/Summer 1998. October 1997, La Conciergerie, Paris. Twenty men of varying ages bring, on hangers, clothing presented by video, explained by text, and projected on five towers covered in white cotton, close to the public. 
Martin Margiela: Our Summer 1998 collection explores the transformation of a two-dimensional garment which becomes three-dimensional on the human body.

dekonstruktivisme:

Maison Martin Margiela spring—summer 1998.

During the second phase of the fashion process, when the identified sources are presented for the first time to a public, there is a need for some distance: the forms have not yet been tempered, the public’s resistance has not been tested. A meticulously staged ritual, bordering on the theatrical, is required. For clothing, the fashion show provides this milieu,… Val K. Warke, Architecture. Observing the mechanisms of fashion, in Architecture: In Fashion, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, 1994, p. 135.

Maison Martin Margiela. Collection Spring/Summer 1998. October 1997, La Conciergerie, Paris. Twenty men of varying ages bring, on hangers, clothing presented by video, explained by text, and projected on five towers covered in white cotton, close to the public. 

Martin Margiela: Our Summer 1998 collection explores the transformation of a two-dimensional garment which becomes three-dimensional on the human body.

hautekills:

Maison Martin Margiela haute couture f/w 2014

hautekills:

Maison Martin Margiela haute couture f/w 2014

hautekills:

Maison Martin Margiela haute couture f/w 2014

hautekills:

Maison Martin Margiela haute couture f/w 2014

This collection revisits the collective memory of Haute Couture ensemble and re-ensemble through periods, places and people. Such as recomposed relics and fabrics that have been transformed into a collection that blends the idea of love and memories worn proudly and passed to others that will later add another element from themselves. Interesting the idea proposed for this season by the Maison Martin Margiela haute couture atelier to re-interpret old garments and transforming them from sample embroideries and ordinary items into new gorgeous pieces.

Look 1: white shirt cut from cotton and is decorated with broaches and buttons. The production time it took 22 hours to make. The broaches and buttons are gilded bronze which are thin as a nail.

Look 2: Flowers motifs are re-interpreted from an 18th century-style wallpapers. Some of the fabrics are new, some are old re-interpreted to create a new haute couture garment.

Look 7: The top is inspired by Louis XV’s wallpaper and the mesh skirt is embroidered with old coins (french francs) found all over Paris and Brussels in flea markets. 26 hours of production on the skirt alone.

Look 8: The coat is made from different collage swatches of cashmere and the mess skirt is embroidered with old coins. Playing with the idea of the value of haute couture.

Look 11: 3-D embroidery creating a blue lobster worn as a shawl with a couture bustier and a mesh skirt embroidered with coins. 86 hours for the top and 26 for the skirt.

Look 14: 20’s panel dress altered into a children’s party costume in the 30’s and it has been now re-resembled and restored on a frame. The idea was to take expensive embroidered fabrics from different places to create a new dress.

Look 15: An aluminum “I Love You” party balloon embroidered with red crystals. The idea of wearing your favorite things as garments or items that would have memorable stories. The skirt is made of different sample embroideries attached together.

Look 19: The jacket has a description in the back saying “To the best father in the world from your loving son, Herbert. 1949 Tokio, Japan” which has been restored and lined, worn over a couture bustier and the skirt made from different sample embroideries.

Look 21: Japanese bomber jacket from the 50’s as a souvenir from antique dealers from New York which has been restored and embroidered with japanese motifs.

Backstage at the Maison Martin Margiela Autumn-Winter 2014 ‘Artisanal’ show. ©Edouard Caupeil

Maison Martin Margiela’s Autumn-Winter 2014 ‘Artisanal’ show 

shot by Alexandra Utzmann for CR Fashion Book

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal jacket, skirt, and boots; Buccellati rings.
Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal coat.
Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal top, trousers, and boots; (left hand) Buccellati ring; (right hand) Stephen Webster ring.
Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal jacket and skirt; Stephen Webster earrings and ring.
Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal jackets and trousers; Buccellati ring; Florsheim by Duckie
Brown shoes.
Photo by Tim Walker

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal jacket, skirt, and boots; Buccellati rings.

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal coat.

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal top, trousers, and boots; (left hand) Buccellati ring; (right hand) Stephen Webster ring.

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal jacket and skirt; Stephen Webster earrings and ring.

Maison Martin Margiela Artisanal jackets and trousers; Buccellati ring; Florsheim by Duckie

Brown shoes.

Photo by Tim Walker

showstudio:

Petite mains working on the spring 2014 Schiaparelli couture collection

showstudio:

Petite mains working on the spring 2014 Schiaparelli couture collection

cotonblanc:

Grace Coddington by Mario Testino for Vanity Fair September 2014

cotonblanc:

Grace Coddington by Mario Testino for Vanity Fair September 2014

carangi:

Rei Kawakubo

carangi:

Rei Kawakubo